AlcoHOLidays | Mexican Independence Day | The Caliente

Sips

Raise your hands, all of you who think (thought) Cinco de Mayo was Mexico’s Independence Day.

Okay, put your hands back down.

For the record, Cinco de Mayo (May 5th) celebrates the Mexican victory over the French at the Battle of Puebla in 1862. Fifty-two years earlier, however, Mexico began it’s fight for independence from Spain with the “Cry of Dolores” (Dolores being a city, not a person–the actual “cry” came from a Roman Catholic Priest by the name of Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla) on September 16, 1810. Even though they would not be completely free of Spanish rule until 1821, September 16th is recognized as the National Day of Independence in Mexico.

Partida Tequila and the Caliente cocktail for Mexican Independence Day

Now that we’ve had our history lesson for the week, let’s raise our glass, once again, to independence.

Tequila Partida contacted me about the upcoming holiday and sent me some samples of their lovely, lovely tequilas. They also wondered (and I have to join them in their puzzlement) why Americans celebrate Mexican holidays (or, you know, Tuesday) with blanco tequila, when the aged reposado and anejo tequilas are the grades of choice for celebrations in Mexico.

I’ve never been a huge fan of blanco tequila (aka unaged tequila)–it’s often too harsh and lacks that wonderful warmth that I associate with a good margarita (and that would be a margarita on the rocks, none of this slushy nonsense thank you very much). True, the aging process (while adding quality) does add to the price, but for superior flavor I think it’s worth it..

I had the opportunity to sample the Partida’s blanco, reposado, and anejo tequilas and I have to say, I was surprised that I liked the blanco better than the reposado, but not at all surprised that I enjoyed the anejo even more. What’s the difference?

  • Blanco is not aged at all, but Partida’s blanco is relatively smooth, light and crisp without the hard edges the other blanco’s I’ve tasted have had.
  • Reposado, by Mexican law, must be aged a minimum of 2 months. Partida ages their for 6 months, which gives it a nice, light amber color. While I enjoyed the depth of flavor, it hadn’t smoothed out as much as I would have expected.
  • Anejo, by Mexican law, must be aged a minimum of 1 year. Again, Partida goes beyond the minimum and ages their anejo for 18 months, the outcome of which is a smooth, complex flavor and a nice, golden color. Tasting them side-by-side, even a tequila novice would be able to tell the difference in how smooth and mellow the anejo is compared to the reposado. This is what I want in my margaritas from now on.

Of course, you know me, I like my spirits best in a well-balanced cocktail, and this recipe (courtesy of Jacques Bezuidenhout and Tequila Partida) might be just the thing to add to your tequila cocktail repetoire.

The Caliente

3 chunks of fresh Pineapple
2 coins of fresh Ginger
1/4 oz Lime Juice
1/4 oz Agave Nectar*
1 1/2 oz aged Tequila (like Partida Reposado or Anejo)
1 oz Ginger Ale

In a mixing glass combine the pineapple, ginger, lime juice, and agave nectar and muddle until the ginger is broken up a bit. Fill the glass 3/4-full with ice and add the tequila. Shake like you’re keeping time with a lively mariachi band. Pour in ginger ale and swish it around to chill everything together before straining into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with a piece of crystallized ginger.

Jacques will have to forgive me as I made some tweaks to the recipe–he recommends Partida Reposado, I would go with Anejo, and he used a scant 1/4 oz of ginger ale and I thought why bother if that’s all your adding? I also have you serve it in a cocktail glass where he suggests over ice in a highball. Do what you like. I liked the ginger in this cocktail, the tequila gives it a very nice flavor, but I do wish the pineapple were more foreward–it gets a bit buried under the oompf of the other flavors, so you might want to try pineapple juice instead of the ginger ale or maybe even pineapple soda!

*Agave Nectar is making quite a buzz in culinary circles, and therefore with the home gastronome as well. Most folks say it’s lower calorie but that’s not really true. What is true is that, ounce for ounce, agave nectar is sweeter than table sugar, so you can use less–IF you use less, volumetrically-speaking, then yes, it’s reducing your calories, but a gram of sugar and a gram of agave nectar both add the same amount of calories. Read those labels, though! Manufacturers have been known to stretch their agave nectar in the name of profit with high fructose corn syrup, so check that the ingredient list includes only 100% agave nectar before bringing it home.

Okay, folks, remember to go for the gold? Age before beauty? Something like that! But if you were looking for a reason to try some really good tequila this weekend, now you’ve got it!

And come back next week to find out what we’re celebrating next!

“¡Viva Mexico! ¡Viva la independencia!” 

——————–

FTC Disclaimer: I was provided samples of Partida Tequilas for the purpose of review. All opinions are my own. 

50 Shots of America–New Mexico

Sips

Because for the 47th state, OLD Mexico just wouldn’t do… (mostly because of it’s being a separate country and all…)

~~~oOo~~~

With a Smarty Spice Cocktailname like New Mexico, it’s not dangerous to assume that the Land of Enchantment once belonged to Mexico. Inhabited early on by the Navajo and Pueblo Indians (and others), it was 16th century Spanish explorer searching for riches to rival Mexico’s Aztec treasures who named the territory, a name that would stick with it as it became a state on January 6, 1912.

Fast forward to the war years and the state’s wide open spaces made it an ideal testing ground for things like the first atomic bomb and mining crude oil and natural gas. But it’s not all bombs and bunkers; New Mexico has a thriving arts scene reflecting local and international influences.

Smarty Spice

1 slice Jalapeño Pepper
1/4 wedge Lime
splash Club Soda
1 1/4 oz Silver Tequila
1/4 oz Blue Curacao

Muddle the pepper (remove the the seeds and membrane if you want to tone down the spiciness a touch), lime and club soda in the bottom of a mixing glass until the lime is well juiced. Fill the glass with ice, add in the tequila and curacao and shake like a maraca! Strain into a chilled cordial glass enjoy.

Between it’s low population density and high percentage of military and aeronautical careers, New Mexico has the highest concentration of PhD-holders than any other state. One New Mexican City, Hatch, is known as the Green Chile Capital of the World. And, seeing as they share a name and a section of border with Mexico, tequila just seemed the most fitting base. The curacao, though, is mostly for color–it comes pretty close to the state stone’s turquoise hue.

Now, just one word of caution: if you suddenly start seeing UFOs, check to see how many Smarty Spice’s you’ve had before calling the papers; chances are the more you drink, the less smart even the smartest of us become.

Episode 9: I Need a Drink

Podcast

Whether it’s celebrating the new year, starting off the 12th Night celebration or congratulating yourself for getting the mammoth end-of-year to-do list, done, a drink with a kick can do wonders. After all, what we call cordials and liqueurs were once known as restoratives!

As I rambled mentioned on the show, one of my many sites is Sips & Shots, where I create a new cocktail a week and post about other beverage interests from time to time. And if my voice sounds a little rough on the recording, all I can say is it’s a good thing I recorded when I did as I woke up with practically no voice at all the next day!

Now, what you’re really here for, the music:

Pumpkin Pie–Russell Wolff
Alcohol–O Sweet Static
In the Bar Tonight–Dakota
Crazy When She Drinks–Lee Rocker
Sipping Tea–The Gentlemen Callers
Cold Beer–Jeff Ronay
Glass of Wine–The New Autonomous Folksingers
Wine of Her Lips–Billy Bourbon
Vodka Kosovo–On Wave
Martini Time–AirFerg
Ginned Up–John Hughes
Gin & Tonic–Sammy Barker
The Old Black Rum–Great Big Sea
The Saltee Tango–Stoat
Only the Tequila Talking (feat. John Popper)–Lisa Bouchelle
Sweet Tequila–Brain Buckit
Whiskey Time–The Whiskey River Band
Nancy Whisky–Murder the Stout
Drinking Like a Fiddler–Dust Rhinos

And that’s us for another month. Please, everyone, if you do imbibe, don’t be a drunken monkey–use a designated drive, take a cab, or drink at home and do so in moderation.

Fun’s better if you can remember it the next day!

50 Shots of America–Colorado

Sips

Welcome to our continuing trek across the Unites States in search of fun facts and tasty cocktails. This week we’re in the Rocky Mountains, visiting Colorado!

~~~oOo~~~

Imperceptible Kink

Imperceptible Kink

After many changes of hands and disputes over the years, the free Territory of Colorado was organized by outgoing-President Buchanan in February of 1861. Named for the Colorado River, it would more than 15 years before Colorado would officially become a state in August of 1876–100 years after we declaration our independence from British rule–with boundaries made up of latitude and longitude markings, not natural boundaries (and it’s only 1 of 3 states like this).

While gold and silver were big pulls to the Centennial State in the 1800s, more than half the Colorado population is settled in the greater-Denver area where industry and agriculture now hold sway. Denver, Aspen and Boulder are well-known foodie destinations but the natural splendor of the state’s many parks, forests, trails and refuges help keep the population fit and healthy. It’s also making a name for itself in wine–both the grape and fruit-based varieties–while maintaining the largest annual production of beer in the country.

Of course, what I first think of, when Colorado comes to mind, is John Denver. Now, granted, he’s not a native son but he was adopted as their official Poet Laureate in 1977 and his song, Rocky Mountain High, is one of the 2 state songs for Colorado. I went through a bit of a folk music phase about 10 years ago and Denver was one of my favorites. Even so, I’m still finding songs of his I didn’t know were his to begin with. If I had to narrow it down to a top 5, just off the top of my head, the list would include:

  • My Sweet Lady
  • Wild Montana Sky
  • Goodbye Again
  • A Song for All Lovers
  • Perhaps Love (with Placido Domingo)

And, oh, 5 is not nearly enough but, well, I’m digressing and there’s a cocktail to get to!

Ahem.

Earlier I mentioned that the borders of Colorado are based on lines of latitude and longitude. Apparently, though, the surveyors charged with marking the official border faced some challenges while tracing the longitudinal border with Utah resulting in “several nearly imperceptible kinks.”

Oh, that’s just too good a phrase to pass up. Hence…

The Imperceptible Kink

1 oz Sleepytime-infused Tequila*
1/2 oz Peach Nectar
1/2 oz Beer

Combine over ice and shake vigorously–not quite like crossing the Continental Divide, but close. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

*To Infuse Tequila: Heat 2 oz of Tequila until steamy and fragrant and remove from heat. Add 1 Sleepytime tea bag and steep for approximately 2 minutes. Remove the tea bag and let the mixture cool until ready to use. Tip: this smells great but don’t inhale too deeply or you’ll find yourself choking on the alcohol fumes. Not that we did that or anything…

Colorado boasts a significant Hispanic population, so we’ve got a Tequila base to represent that. I’ve had cocktails served to me with both tequila and beer, and with Coors being a Colorado company and all the microbreweries there, it seemed a natural addition. Peach is apparently one of the common fruit-based wines produced there but I was still looking for something else–something to give that hint of imperceptible kink!

Enter Celestial Seasonings, a Boulder company since 1969. I have several of their products in my tea cabinet and felt Sleepytime, with its definite floral taste and aroma, would pair perfectly with the botanical taste of tequila. The end result is a cocktail with a clean, crisp feel, a hint of peach and beer at the end and that little something else that you’re not quite sure about. That’s the infused tequila.

~~~oOo~~~

Next week we’re heading a north to meet the Dakotas! Until then… Safe Sipping!

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50 Shots of America–Texas

Sips
Miss Independent

Miss Independent

It’s fitting that this week’s state is Texas as I was planning to be in the Lone Star State this weekend for the Dallas Webcomics Expo, but scheduling issues (and that little trip to Nebraska in June) put a kink in this month’s travel plans. Ah, well, such is life! But because of that, I want to dedicate this week’s cocktail to all the Independent artists and creators out there making their own way!

Miss Independent

1 oz Tequila
1 oz Tomato Juice
1/2 oz Pepper Vodka
dash Worcestershire Sauce
Celery Salt and Celery Stalk for garnish

Combine liquid ingredients over ice and shake like you’re facing the double loops of the Shock Wave coaster. Strain into a chilled cordial glass, sprinkle with celery salt and stir with the celery stalk.

Six Flags Over Texas is not just a theme park–it’s the number of flags that have flown in governance over the current state’s boundaries: Spanish, French, Mexican, the Republic of Texas, itself, the US and the Confederate States of America during the Civil War. In fact, the only reason they gave up their hard-won independence was their inability to defend against Mexico’s continued advances. Smart move, making an alliance and becoming a state via treaty (December 29.1845).

Oil and cereals don’t make for good cocktails, so we’re going with the Tex-Mex influence and making, essentially, a Tequila Mary. The pepper vodka adds kick, even at such a low amount, and a flavor almost as large as our second largest state. (And, yes, the name is both a reference to the former republic status of the state and the song by Texas native Kelly Clarkson.)

http://www.novusvinum.com/pairings/main.htmlWine & Appetizers/Snacks

ANTIPASTO
Pinot Gris, (Dry) Chenin Blanc
, Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Blanc, Gamay Beaujolais, Barbera

ASPARAGUS
Sauvignon (Fumé) Blanc, (Dry) Riesling, Vidal Blanc

CARPACCIO (BEEF)
Barbera, Cabernet Rosé, Rhône Blends

CARPACCIO (TUNA)
Sauvignon (Fumé) Blanc, Vin Gris

CAVIAR
Brut Sparkling Wine

CLAMS (RAW OR CASINO)
Sauvignon (Fumé) Blanc, Brut Sparkling Wine, (Dry) Chenin Blanc, Pinot Blanc, Seyval Blanc

COLD MEATS
Vin Gris, Riesling, Gamay Beaujolais, Barbera, Seyval Blanc, (Dry) Vignoles, Chambourcin Rosé

CRUDITÉS
Pinot Blanc, Chenin Blanc, Chardonnay, Gamay Beaujolais

FOIE GRAS
Brut Sparkling Wine, Late-Harvest Riesling, Sauvignon Blanc, Gewürztraminer, Muscat, Pinot Noir

NICOISE SALAD
Sauvignon (Fumé) Blanc

NUTS AND/OR OLIVES
Brut Sparkling Wine

OYSTERS (RAW)
Sauvignon (Fumé) Blanc, Brut Sparkling Wine, Pinot Gris, Chardonnay, (Dry) Riesling, Pinot Blanc, Chenin Blanc

PASTA SALAD
Sémillon, Sauvignon (Fumé) Blanc, (Dry) Chenin Blanc, (Dry) Riesling

PASTA WITH CREAM SAUCE
Chardonnay, Pinot Blanc

PASTA WITH SHELLFISH
Sauvignon (Fumé) Blanc, Chardonnay

PASTA WITH TOMATO SAUCE
Barbera, Sangiovese, Zinfandel Rhône Blends

PASTA WITH VEGETABLES
Pinot Blanc, Dry Riesling, Sauvignon Blanc, Viognier, Gamay Beaujolais, Barbera

PATÉS
Gewürztraminer, Seyval Blanc, Gamay Beaujolais, Riesling, Brut Sparkling Wine, Cabernet Franc, Vin Gris

PROSCIUTTO AND MELON
Pinot Blanc, Riesling, Late Harvest Riesling or Gewürztraminer, Muscat

QUICHE
Riesling, Chenin Blanc, Chardonnay, Viognier, Gamay Beaujolais

SCALLOPS
Sauvignon (Fumé) Blanc, Chardonnay, Brut Sparkling Wine, Pinot Noir, Sémillon

SMOKED FISH (TROUT, HERRING)
Riesling, Gewürztraminer, Pinot Blanc, Brut Sparkling Wine

SOUPS
Usually none, or (Solera) Sherry

Wine Pairings: Seafood

Large scallops with cream sauce and parsley

Whether you’re at a restaurant
or hosting a dinner party, it can be difficult to select the perfect wine to sip with your meal. A good pairing will bring balance to the dish and enhance the flavors of both the food and the wine. Following are our expert suggestions on what to pair with seafood, from lobster to sushi.

CLAMS (RAW OR CASINO)
Sauvignon (Fumé) Blanc, Brut
Sparkling Wine, (Dry) Chenin Blanc, Pinot Blanc, Seyval Blanc

CRAB
Sauvignon (Fumé) Blanc, Brut Sparkling Wine, Chardonnay, Sake, White Rhône Varietals (e.g. Roussanne, Marsanne)

LOBSTER
Brut Sparkling Wine, Chardonnay, Sake, White Rhône Varietals (e.g. Roussanne, Marsanne)

MUSSELS
Chenin Blanc, Pinot Blanc, Pinot Gris, Sauvignon (Fumé) Blanc

OYSTERS (RAW)
Sauvignon (Fumé) Blanc, Brut Sparkling Wine, Pinot Gris, Chardonnay, (Dry) Riesling, Pinot Blanc, Chenin Blanc

RED SNAPPER
Chardonnay, Sauvignon (Fumé) Blanc

SALMON
Pinot Noir, Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Gris, Sémillon, Vin Gris

SALMON TARTARE
Brut Sparkling Wine, Pinot Gris, Sake

SASHIMI, SUSHI
Brut Sparkling Wine, Semi-Dry Riesling, Sake

SCALLOPS
Sauvignon (Fumé) Blanc, Chardonnay, Brut Sparkling Wine, Pinot Noir, Sémillon

SHRIMP
Pinot Blanc, Chenin Blanc, Sauvignon (Fumé) Blanc, Chardonnay, Colombard, Vidal Blanc

STRIPED BASS
Chardonnay, Pinot Blanc, Viognier, (Dry) Vignoles

SWORDFISH
Sauvignon (Fumé) Blanc, Brut Sparkling Wine, Vin Gris, Pinot Noir

TUNA
Sauvignon (Fumé) Blanc, Pinot Noir, Merlot, Vin Gris, Chardonnay

OTHER WHITE FISH
Chardonnay, Viognier, Dry Riesling, Sémillon

Wine Pairings: Meat & Poultry
A juicy cut of steak

Whether you’re at a restaurant or hosting a dinner party, it can be difficult to select the perfect wine to sip with your meal. A good pairing will bring balance to the dish and enhance the flavors of both the food and the wine. Following are our expert suggestions on what to pair with meat and poultry, from steak to duck.

CHICKEN
Chardonnay, Vin Gris, Riesling, Merlot, Gamay Beaujolais, Chenin Blanc, Pinot Noir, (Lighter) Cabernet Sauvignon

CHICKEN SALAD
Riesling, Chenin Blanc, Gewürztraminer, Pinot Blanc

CHICKEN (SMOKED)
Vin Gris, Pinot Noir, Zinfandel

DUCK
Pinot Noir, Merlot, Rosé Sparkling Wine, Cabernet Sauvignon, Zinfandel

FRANKFURTER
Riesling, (Chilled) Gamay Beaujolais

HAM
Vin Gris, Gamay Beaujolais, Merlot

HAMBURGER
Cabernet Sauvignon, Gamay, Syrah, Chancellor, Barbera, Zinfandel, Rhône Blends

LAMB (GRILLED, BROILED)
Meritage, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Pinot Noir, Marechal Foch, Chancellor, Zinfandel

PHEASANT
Pinot Noir, Syrah

QUAIL
Pinot Noir

RABBIT
Riesling, Pinot Noir, Barbera, Merlot, Zinfandel

SAUSAGE
Riesling, Brut or Rosé Sparkling Wine, Barbera, Gamay Beaujolais, Norton or Cynthiana, Syrah, Zinfandel

STEAK (GRILLED, BROILED)
Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Rhône Blends, Zinfandel, Meritage, Norton or Cynthiana, Syrah, Brut Sparkling Wine

TURKEY
Merlot, Zinfandel, Chardonnay, Gamay Beaujolais

VEAL
Chardonnay, Barbera, Merlot, Cynthiana

VENISON
Syrah, Rhône Blends, Petite Sirah, Zinfandel, Pinot Noir, Norton, Chancellor, Cabernet Sauvignon

Wine Pairings: Other Main Courses
A freshly baked pizza with shaved truffles

Whether you’re at a restaurant or hosting a dinner party, it can be difficult to select the perfect wine to sip with your meal. A good pairing will bring balance to the dish and enhance the flavors of both the food and the wine. Following are our expert suggestions on what to pair with other main courses, from pizza to couscous.

COUSCOUS
Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Petite Sirah, Rosé Sparkling Wine, Syrah, Vin Gris

CURRY, FISH or CHICKEN
Riesling, (Chilled) Gamay Beaujolais, Sauvignon (Fumé) Blanc, Zinfandel

MOUSSAKA
Merlot, Sangiovese, Barbera, Zinfandel

PIZZA
Barbera, Zinfandel, Sangiovese, Brut or Rosé Sparkling Wine, Cabernet Rosé

SPICY CHINESE
Dry (and off-dry) Riesling, Pinot Gris, Pinot Blanc, Brut or Rosé Sparkling Wine, Merlot

SPICY MEXICAN
Dry (and off-dry) Riesling, Vin Gris, Chenin Blanc, (Chilled) Gamay Beaujolais

THAI
Chenin Blanc, Pinot Blanc, Riesling, Gewürztraminer, Brut or Rosé Sparkling Wine

Wine Pairings: Cheeses
A selection of hard and soft cheeses with grapes

Whether you’re at a restaurant or hosting a dinner party, it can be difficult to select the perfect wine to sip with your meal. A good pairing will bring balance to the dish and enhance the flavors of both the food and the wine. Following are our expert suggestions on what to pair with soft, medium and hard cheese.

GOAT
SOFT: Brut or Rosé Sparkling Wine, Sauvignon (Fumé) Blanc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Pinot Noir
HARD: Pinot Noir, Merlot, Syrah, Cabernet Sauvignon

COW & SHEEP
MEDIUM: Pinot Noir, Petite Sirah
HARD: Cabernet Sauvignon, Petite Sirah, Zinfandel, Port Blue, Late-Harvest Riesling, Chenin Blanc, Gewürztraminer, Muscat, Zinfandel

Wine Pairings: Desserts
Chocolate ice cream cake with chocolate sauce and fruit

Whether you’re at a restaurant or hosting a dinner party, it can be difficult to select the perfect wine to sip with your meal. A good pairing will bring balance to the dish and enhance the flavors of both the food
and the wine. Following are our expert suggestions on what to pair with desserts, from apple pie to tiramisu.

APPLE PIE, TART & BAKED
Late-Harvest Riesling, Various Ice Wines, Muscat, Demi-sec Sparkling Wines, Blueberry Wine

BERRIES
Brut Sparkling Wines, Demi-sec Sparkling Wines, Late-Harvest Riesling, Muscat, Zinfandel

CHOCOLATE
Late-Harvest Riesling, Raspberry Wine, Black Muscat, Cabernet Sauvignon

CAKES
Demi-sec Sparkling Wines, Late-Harvest Riesling, Muscat, Various Ice Wines

CREAMS, CUSTARDS, PUDDINGS
Demi-sec Sparkling Wines, Late-Harvest Riesling, Muscat, Various Ice Wines

FRESH FRUIT
Late-Harvest Chenin Blanc, Riesling, Gewürztraminer, Muscat

ICE CREAM, SORBETS
Usually none, perhaps fruit wine or fruit liqueurs

NUTS
Port, Brut Sparkling Wine, Angelica

TIRAMISU
Angelica

Wine Pairings: Red Wines
A glass of red wine in a California vineyard

Whether you’re at a restaurant or hosting a dinner party, it can be difficult to select the perfect wine to sip with your meal. A good pairing will bring balance to the dish and enhance the flavors of both the food and the wine. Following are our expert suggestions on what foods to pair with red wines, from Cabernet Sauvignon to Merlot.

BARBERA
Antipasto, carpaccio (beef), cold meats, pasta with tomato sauce, pasta with vegetables, pizza, hamburger, rabbit, sausage, veal, moussaka

CABERNET FRANC
Paté, Couscous

CABERNET SAUVIGNON
Chicken, steak, duck, lamb, venison, hamburger, soft or hard goat cheese, hard cow and sheep cheese, chocolate, berries

CHANCELLOR
Lamb (grilled or broiled), venison, hamburger

CHIANTI
Pasta with tomato sauce, pizza, most Italian foods

GAMAY BEAUJOLAIS
Chicken, ham, turkey, sausage, antipasto, cold meats, crudité, pasta with vegetables, paté, quiche, hamburger, frankfurters, curry (chicken or fish), spicy Mexican foods

MERITAGE
Steak, lamb

MERLOT
Chicken, steak, turkey, tuna, duck, ham, lamb, rabbit, veal, couscous, moussaka, spicy Chinese foods, soft or hard goat cheese

NORTON
Steak, venison, sausage

PETITE SIRAH
Venison, couscous, medium and hard cow cheese, medium and hard sheep cheese

PINOT NOIR
Salmon, tuna, scallops, swordfish, chicken, duck, lamb, pheasant, quail, rabbit, venison, foie gras, soft or hard goat cheese, medium cow and sheep cheese

SANGIOVESE
Pizza, moussaka

SYRAH
Steak, sausage, venison, hamburger, pheasant, couscous, hard goat cheese

ZINFANDEL
Chicken, steak, turkey, duck, lamb, rabbit, hamburger, sausage, venison, curry (chicken or fish), moussaka, pizza, hard cow and sheep cheese

Wine Pairings: White Wines
A glass of white wine with a dinner roll

Whether you’re at a restaurant or hosting a dinner party, it can be difficult to select the perfect wine to sip with your meal. A good pairing will bring balance to the dish and enhance the flavors of both the food and the wine. Following are our expert suggestions on what foods to pair with white wines, from Chardonnay to Riesling.

CHARDONNAY
Shrimp, lobster, crab, scallops, red snapper, striped bass, other white fish, tuna, oysters (raw), pasta with shellfish, pasta with clam sauce, crudité, chicken, turkey, veal

CHENIN BLANC
Chicken, shrimp, oysters (raw), clams, mussels, antipasto, crudité, quiche, pasta salad, Thai foods, spicy Mexican foods, hard cow and sheep cheese

COLOMBARD
Shrimp

CYNTHIANA
Steak, sausage, veal

GEWÃœRZTRAMINER
Foie gras, paté, prosciutto, smoked fish (trout, herring), chicken salad, Thai foods, hard cow and sheep cheese, fresh fruit

MARSANNE
Crab, lobster

MUSCAT
Foie gras, prosciutto, hard cow and sheep cheese, berries, custards, puddings

PINOT BLANC
Shrimp, striped bass, mussels, smoked fish (trout, herring), clams, oysters (raw), antipasto, pasta with cream sauce, pasta with vegetables, crudité, prosciutto, chicken salad, spicy Chinese foods, Thai foods

PINOT GRIGIO / GRIS
Salmon, salmon tartare, oysters (raw), mussels, antipasto, spicy Chinese foods

RIESLING (DRY)
Chicken, white fish, smoked fish (trout, herring), oysters (raw), rabbit, sausage, pasta salad, pasta with vegetables, paté, prosciutto, quiche, frankfurters, curry (fish or chicken), spicy Chinese foods, spicy Mexican foods, Thai foods

RIESLING (SEMI-DRY)
Chicken, sausage, sushi, sashimi, smoked fish (trout, herring), quiche, asparagus, cold meats, paté, prosciutto, rabbit, chicken salad, curry (chicken or fish), spicy Chinese foods, spicy Mexican foods, Thai foods

ROUSSANNE
Crab, lobster

SAUVIGNON (FUMÉ) BLANC
Salmon, shrimp, swordfish, tuna, red snapper, mussels, crab, scallops, clams, oysters (raw), pasta with shellfish, pasta with vegetables, pasta salad, Nicoise salad, asparagus, antipasto, foie gras, curry (fish or chicken), soft goat cheese

SÉMILLON
Salmon, scallops, white fish, pasta salad

SEYVAL BLANC
Clams, cold meats, paté

VIDAL BLANC
Shrimp, asparagus

VIGNOLES
Cold meats, striped bass

VIN GRIS
Chicken, salmon, swordfish, tuna, ham, cold meats, paté, couscous, smoked chicken, spicy Mexican foods

VIOGNIER
White fish, quiche, pasta with vegetables

Wine Pairings: Other Wines
A glass of Rose

Whether you’re at a restaurant or hosting a dinner party, it can be difficult to select the perfect wine to sip with your meal. A good pairing will bring balance to the dish and enhance the flavors of both the food and the wine. Following are our expert suggestions on what foods to pair with Rosé, ice wine, sake and more.

BRUT SPARKLING WINE
Lobster, crab, scallops, caviar, oysters (raw), clams, swordfish, smoked fish (trout, herring), sushi, sashimi, salmon tartare, steak, sausage, pizza, foie gras, nuts, olives, paté, spicy Chinese foods, Thai foods, soft goat cheese

CABERNET ROSÉ
Pizza, carpaccio (beef)

ICE WINES
Pies, cakes, most desserts

RIESLING (LATE HARVEST)
Desserts in general, foie gras, prosciutto and melon, hard cow and sheep cheese

ROSÉ SPARKLING WINE
Duck, pizza, couscous, spicy Chinese foods, Thai foods, soft goat cheese

SAKE
Sushi, sashimi, crab, lobster, salmon tartare, Japanese foods